You know the saying "Be careful what you wish for. You may just get it." Well, I'm sure that has happened to many of us. Sometimes it works for the best and sometimes it bites you in the you know what.

One of the things I wished for when I was growing up, was to get out of living in the country and become a city dweller. I lived about 15 miles from the nearest town, which isn't real far, but when you're a kid and you have no transportation to rely on, that 15 miles might as well be 1000 miles.

Sure, I could ask my dad to take me into town to hang out with my school buddies after he got home from work, but after a long day or work and chores to be done at home, that option was  not on the table. So I spend a lot of time alone in the country as I was growing up.

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When I graduated high school, I got a car, went to a local community college and then moved out when I was 20. Finally, I was out of the woods and into the concrete jungle where I've been now for several decades. I got what I asked for.

And now, I'm asking for the opposite. While I enjoy being close to everything, I think my desire for city living has run out. I think buying a camper and spending weekends and vacations at a campground in the middle of nowhere was made me wanting to return to the country.

I'd gladly trade in my residence from noizy neighbors to the sounds of crickets and I've noticed that most people who live in the country are much nicer, and will bend over backward to help you when needed.

Plus, with living in a rural community, you get to know your neighbors and become friends since they are most likely living there for the long term. There are just a few people in my city neighborhood that I know. There are a lot of apartment buildings in my neighborhood with people who come and go within a year or two.

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