I'm sure this has happened to all of us.  It's summer and you see a dark left in a parked car.  You want to do something to help the animal, but what "can" you do?  According to Patch.com, Pennsylvania has a new law that is designed to help protect animals left in hot cars.

The Motor Vehicle Extreme Heat Protection Act allows law enforcement officer to enter a car if they think an animal is in danger.  The law protects the officer from liability for any damages to the vehicle.

If you encounter an animal inside a car and you feel it is in danger, do not attempt to enter the vehicle.  The new law does not protect citizens.  Instead, the Humane Society of the United States recommends you take the following steps:

  • Take down the car's make, model and license plate number and take that to any nearby businesses or public places.  In those places, ask a manager or employee to make an announcement, if possible.
  • If the owner does not respond, call local law enforcement.

The Humane Society also reminds pet owners:

  • "When it's 72 degrees Fahrenheit outside, the temperature inside your car can heat up to 116 degrees Fahrenheit within an hour."
  • "When it's 80 degrees Fahrenheit outside, the temperature inside your car can heat up to 99 degrees Fahrenheit within 10 minutes."
  • "Rolling down the windows has been shown to have little effect on the temperature inside a car."

For more information, click here.