If you're thinking about starting your own business in New York, you might want to buckle up. According to Forbes, the Empire State has been ranked as the second worst state in the entire United States for getting your business off the ground.

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Forbes did some digging to find out why New York landed near the bottom. The more they dug, the worse it got.  It turns out, that the state is not winning any medals when it comes to business costs, business climate, financial accessibility, economy, or the workforce.

The only state to finish lower was Vermont, as the absolute worst state to start a business. But wait, there's more. New York is tied with Massachusetts for having the highest business costs in the entire country.

It looks like New York is also facing some startup struggles in the Northeast. Maine claimed the sixth-worst spot. Maryland didn't want to be left out, snagging the ninth spot. Seems like the entire region has its fair share of challenges for entrepreneurs. You can see the entire rankings here.

Starting a business in New York might be a bit tough, but it's not all doom and gloom. The state does have a diverse economy and a talented workforce. These can give you a leg up and make your entrepreneurial journey a little smoother. Here's more good news, New York ranked as the tenth healthiest in the United States so you can stay fit while beginning your startup scene.

If you're looking for the best state to start your business, Forbes says North Dakota is it. Indiana, Arkansas, South Dakota, and North Carolina also made the cut, providing promising conditions for anyone wanting to start their own business.

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Gallery Credit: Liz Barrett Foster