Imagine a world where you don't have to change your clocks twice a year and it's not pitch black when you leave work in the winter. This may not be just a figment of your imagination for much longer, thanks to a new proposed bill in New York.

A state senator is leading the push to make daylight saving time permanent across New York and the entire Northeast.

Sen. Joseph Griffo announced on Monday that he is introducing a bill that would make daylight saving time standard across the state year-round.

"It’s time to turn the page on changing our clocks twice a year and, given the similar interests of New York and contiguous states, it makes sense to do so regionally," Griffo said in a statement. "I am looking forward to working with my legislative colleagues in other states to make permanent daylight saving time a reality in the Northeastern United States."

According to the statement, daylight saving time was first introduced in the United States in 1918 as a way to conserve energy. The U.S. Department of Transportation has also observed that daylight saving time prevents injuries in traffic accidents, reduces crime and saves lives because more people are out and about and traveling safely with the extra hour of daylight.

Full-time daylight saving time, as Griffo is proposing in his new bill, is not allowed by federal law and would require an act from Congress to change, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. However, 13 states (Arkansas, Delaware, Maine, Florida, Oregon, Tennessee, Washington, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, South Carolina, Utah and Wyoming) have enacted legislation that would let them switch to year-round daylight saving time if allowed by Congress.

Currently, Arizona and Hawaii, along with U.S. territories American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands, are the only places in the United States that do not follow daylight saving time.

Do you think New York should continue to push for year-round daylight saving time in order to avoid the hassle of turning back the clocks? Let us know your thoughts inside our station app.

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