Recently, I wrote an article about the New York State burn ban which went into effect on March 16th and goes through May 14th. The heightened chance of brush and grass fires continues.

Pretty straightforward rule and directive from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, but a few people commented on social media that they were less than happy about this burn ban. This does not include campfires or small cooking fires, but caution is advised.

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania recently issued a Red Flag Warning for a couple of days in late April For the danger of wildfire. It was due to low relative humidity and strong winds, that allow fuels to dry out and become favorable for fire spread if set ablaze.

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Again, while some may think that recent snowfall and rainfall have made for more moisture, that's not the case. Brush and ground cover continues to be low on moisture. Add any high winds, and that could result in an out-of-control fire.

For example, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation reported an incident in Otsego County where a resident was burning a large area on his property.

The report states that the property owner was attempting to rid the yard of blackberries. This person was not aware of the burn ban, but after the local fire department brought the flames under control, the property owner was fined.

According to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, they have enforced this ban each spring since 2009, to help prevent wildfires and protect communities during heightened conditions for wildfires.

As for campfires or small cooking fires, the NYS DEC says to burn only charcoal or dry, clean, untreated, or unpainted wood, and never leave any fires unattended. Be sure to extinguish before leaving.

For more information about fire safety and prevention, Visit the DNYS DEC FIREWISE New York website.

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